100 highlights

  • 12-02-2018 until 24-04-2018

    From 12 February to 22 April 2018, the Museum of Bags and Purses is displaying 100 historical highlights from its own collection in the new, temporary exhibition called ‘100 highlights’. The exhibition shines a spotlight on the most remarkable bags from the 16th to 19th centuries. These include the oldest bag, dating back to the early 16th century, and the very first bag, acquired in 1987, which led to the Museum of Bags and Purses’ unique collection. Visitors can also discover more about the extraordinary materials and techniques that played a pivotal role throughout these centuries.

    Tassenmuseum Hendrikje - 100 Highlights

    The first bag in the collection, a tortoise bag with pearl, 1820 -1830

     

    A journey through time

    The new exhibition ‘100 highlights’ shines a spotlight on the most remarkable bags from the 16th to 19th centuries. Visitors can also discover more about the extraordinary materials and techniques that played a pivotal role throughout these centuries.

     

     

    The oldest bag in the collection, early 16th century

     

     

    The oldest and most noteworthy bags

    The collection with the oldest bags houses a diverse selection of purses, wallets, bags with clasps, thigh bags and beaded bags. Between 1600 and 1900, bags used by the elite were often made of special materials, such as tortoiseshell, ivory, brushed steel and wood. From the earliest of times, bags have been used as practical, everyday objects, for men and women. Because clothing did not have pockets, people used bags and purses to carry money and other personal items. From the late middle ages until the 17th century, bags and purses were hung from a belt or girdle. The introduction of pockets in men’s clothing at the beginning of the 17th century meant that men’s bags slowly began to disappear. In later centuries, the bag became the exclusive domain of women, with the exception of bags that men used for hunting and for documents.

     

     

    Tassenmuseum Hendrikje - 100 Highlights

    Velvet purse with silver balls and key, the Netherlands, 1600-1650

     

     

    Museum of Bags and Purses is preparing for the future

    In collaboration with OPERA Amsterdam, the third floor of the museum will be given a facelift. This is where visitors normally encounter bags from the 16th to 19th centuries, but because of the refurbishment work, this floor will be closed to the public from February until the end of April 2018. The other floors of the museum will remain open as usual. During the refurbishment, the most extraordinary bags from the 16th to 19th centuries (‘100 highlights’) can be viewed in the Museum of Bags and Purses’ temporary exhibition space.

     

    Reopening of the third floor

    Once the refurbishment work is complete, a selection of the oldest bags will once again be on permanent display in the new and interactive presentation on the third floor of the museum. In the new space, visitors can discover the stories behind the bag; as an everyday item, as an artisan product, as a culturally historic fashion object and as a status symbol. The reopening of the third floor will be celebrated on Tuesday, 24 April 2018.

     

    Find out more about the refurbishment of the permanent collection in the press release.

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